Publications title

Podcasts

In late 2010 and early 2011, interviews took place with the Programme Director, and the project teams of 'Tate Encounters', 'Fashioning Diaspora Space' and 'Every Object Tells a Story'. They were conducted by Norman Winter, a producer of audio content for broadcast and internet. In the resulting podcasts the teams consider the benefits and challenges of their strategic partnerships, and discuss the value of working collaboratively on diasporas, migration and identities research.


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You can listen to or download podcasts from the Programme Director and some of the award holders here. These podcasts have been created by Norman Winter Audio.



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Tate encounters British Asian Style Every Object Drama and Development Romans in Britain
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  • TATE ENCOUNTERS: Andrew Dewdney, David Dibosa and Victoria Walsh talk with Norman Winter about the Tate Encounters research project funded by the Diasporas, Migration and Identities Programme. Norman Winter met them at Tate Britain to hear about their partnership as a research team. The project brought together London South Bank University and the University of the Arts, London, to work with Tate Britain in a study of why those of a black and minority ethnic background are significantly under-represented in its audiences.
    Listen to the podcast here or save (right click & "save target as")


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  • FASHIONING DIASPORA SPACE: Chris Breward, Philip Crang and Helen Scalway talk with Norman Winter about the Fashioning Diaspora Space research project funded by the Diasporas, Migration and Identities Programme. Norman Winter met them at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London to hear about their partnership as a research team. The project brought together the museum, the artist Helen Scalway, and the Department of Geography at Royal Holloway, University of London, in a collaborative study focused historically on the materials in the museum's South Asian collection, and in a contemporary way on the place of South Asian textiles in today's culture and dress.
    Listen to the podcast here or save (right click & "save target as")


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  • EVERY OBJECT TELLS A STORY: Researchers Kate Pahl and Andy Pollard and designer Zahir Rafiq talk about the "Every Object Tells a Story" project funded by the Diasporas, Migration and Identities Programme. Norman Winter met them in the gallery at Rotherham Central Library which was the setting for the "Ferham Families" exhibition which the team staged. Through both everyday and special objects, families from Pakistan and Kashmir told their stories, across the generations. This partnership linked Sheffield's universities and the local community, and produced academic research, this exhibition, learning resources and its own continuing website www.everyobjecttellsastory.org.uk.

  • Listen to the podcast here or save (right click & "save target as")


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  • TUNING IN: Marie Gillespie, Jess Macfarlane and Hugh Mackay discuss the large research project “Tuning In”, funded by the Diasporas, Migration and Identities Programme. The BBC World Service has regular audiences of well over 100 million through its radio, TV and online services. Today its language services provide well-defined contact zones for diasporas across the globe, uniting as communities those who turn to the BBC for news, entertainment and interactive contact.

    Norman Winter recorded this conversation at the World Service’s prestigious London headquarters, Bush House, which has over its nearly 80 years of operation been a working home to talented and influential broadcasters from around the world, whose own stories also form a focus of study in this wide-ranging project.

    In this podcast Marie Gillespie [Open University] who led the team, her colleague Hugh Mackay [OU], and Jess Macfarlane [BBC] discuss the scope of the research, both into today’s audiences and significant parts of the World Service’s history. A second podcast is also available, discussing in greater detail the team’s collaboration, methods and ideas. Tuning In has its own website: www8.open.ac.uk/researchprojects/diasporas.
    Listen to the podcast here or save (right click & "save target as")



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    AFRICANS IN ROMAN YORK

  • New forensic techniques in archaeology reveal existence of high status Africans living in 4th Century AD York
  • A picture of multi-cultural Britain in 4th Century AD has been revealed using the latest forensic techniques in archaeology. The new research demonstrates that Roman York of the period had individuals of North African descent moving in the highest social circles.
  • The research was conducted by the University of Reading’s Department of Archaeology, working with the Yorkshire Museum’s collections. It will feature in the museum’s brand new exhibition opening in August 2010, which aims to throw new light on the diversity of populations living in Roman York. Part of the AHRC Diasporas, Migration and Identities strategic research programme the research used modern forensic ancestry assessment and isotope (oxygen and strontium) analysis of Romano-British skeletal remains such as the ‘Ivory Bangle Lady’, in conjunction with evidence from grave goods buried with her.
  • Dr Hella Eckardt, Senior Lecturer at the University of Reading, said: “Multi-cultural Britain is not just a phenomenon of more modern times. Analysis of the ‘Ivory Bangle Lady’ and others like her, contradicts common popular assumptions about the make up of Roman-British populations as well as the view that African immigrants in Roman Britain were of low status, male and likely to have been slaves.”

    This is an AHRC podcast which you can listen to here: http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/News/Podcasts/Pages/africansromanyork.aspx